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Living on the edge is part of what makes riding a motorcycle so gratifying.  But when your safety is on the line, do you know everything you should about when it’s important to play by the rules?  You can learn a lot about motorcycle safety from a safety course, and we certainly suggest every rider take one. However, there’s a lot to be learned from experienced riders that you might not pick up in a safety course.  That’s why we’ve compiled this list for you that includes 10 motorcycle safety tips from some of the industry’s top professionals.  Keep reading…they may just change the way you ride!
10 Motorcycle Safety Tips all Riders Should Know
1. Take a motorcycle safety course Some states including Missouri and Arkansas require a skills test before getting a motorcycle license, and some also need a motorcycle safety course.  Even if your state doesn't require you to take a motorcycle safety class, you should seriously consider it. The course will teach you about the traffic laws that apply to motorcycles in your state, how to react to emergency situations on a motorcycle and will give you the opportunity to try out your new experiences in a controlled environment. 2. Get ready to roll Before each ride, do a swift walk-around to make sure your horn, light and directional signals are working correctly.  Check the belt, chain or shaft and the brakes.  Check the tires for wear and make sure they are set at the proper pressure. 3. Always wear a helmet Pick a helmet that is approved by DOT (Federal Government's Department of Transportation) for the best protection.  Modern models are comfortable and lightweight without sacrificing on safety.  Be prepared to spend quite a bit on your helmet.  You cannot put a price on your life, so it is worth the high cost. 4. Wear the right riding gear Those sandals and shorts may be comfortable, but they're a recipe for disaster when riding a motorcycle.  If you slide out, your feet are going to be in for a world of pain.  And those shorts won't provide your legs with much protection either. 5. Ride defensively When you leave the house for a ride, ALWAYS assume that everyone is out to get you!  That may sound a little like paranoia, but think of it this way… That car you meet at an intersection or the one that is approaching you on a lonely two lane back road, or any other interaction with traffic, just assume they don't see you.  Always be prepared in your mind to take defensive measures.  With time this will become second nature and you’ll stay safe. 6. Never ride tired Never ride tired.  And we mean NEVER!  Stop every 75-125 miles.  Every rider knows their tolerance.  And we all seem to like to push it.  Set your rule. Stop.  Stretch.  Refresh yourself and your brain. 7. Always look where you want to go If you are looking at a curb, you're most likely going to hit the curb.  If your looking off the cliff you don't want to ride off of, you’re bound to freak out and hit the brakes or go over the edge.  If traffic suddenly stops and you're staring at the cars in front of you, you may become their new rear bumper. Instead, look for a clear spot, look through the turn, look where you want to go... it never fails and will keep you confident and up on two wheels. 8. Leave room for an escape route When you come to a signal and stop, stay in gear and watch the traffic coming up behind you.  Always leave room for an escape route. 9. Maintain a good speed Speed limits exist for a reason, and all roads and routes have different ones.  Make sure to remain within that limit to dodge dangers.  Use basic sense while addressing a report on your speed.  If the path is empty and wide without traffic, it is okay to ride at top speed as per the limit set for that road. 10. Respect all traffic laws on the road Most of the accidents that occur on roads are the result of reckless driving and disregard of traffic rules.  The latter represent the guidelines on how we should operate on the road and ignoring them puts you at a risk of being involved in an accident. Final notes Remember: when you are on a motorcycle, you're the only one on the road watching out for you.  If your mind and emotions are anyplace other than the road ahead, you're susceptible to executing rookie errors that can end in a crash, injuries or worse.  when the above tips are considered and implemented by motorcycle riders, accidents are less likely to happen. There is a good number of riders out there with years of riding experience that have never been involved in a motorbike accident thanks to their discipline and ethics.  Have a safe journey.  Always.
10 Tips Safety Course
Added: 5-7-2018
Motorcycle crashes are frequently caused due to road hazards. Seemingly minor obstacles on the road such as a wet pavement, small objects, debris, and road surfaces that are uneven typically pose little risk to cars and other automobiles. But they can prove dangerous to bikers and lead to grievous motorcycle accidents and injuries. This is why it is important for motorcyclists to have a clear idea of what all may count as a road hazard. Motorcycle riders need to watch out for these dangers and adopt safeguards against them. 1. Slippery or Slick Surfaces There are quite a few surfaces and objects that are or may turn slippery. Surfaces that are slippery and slick can prove a greater risk to motorcycle riders than drivers of other vehicles. This is because the two-wheeled bike design makes it a less stable driving machine. Furthermore, due to its lighter and smaller size, the motorcycle can slide a considerable distance if it slips on the road, and a crash with another vehicle or a stationary object is more likely. A slick surface can prove particularly risky when the motorcyclist is taking a turn at speed. Here are some types of debris and surfaces that can be slippery, especially during wet conditions: Leaves Crosswalk lines Anti-freeze liquid or oil Trolley tracks Other painted surfaces When a dry spell is followed by rain, it is important for motorcycle riders to be careful. Driving any vehicle is difficult in the first drizzle or rain on a sun-baked road. This is because the water blends with the mud and oil on the road to form a slippery coating. The riskiest time to drive a motorcycle on a road is within the first half hour of a rainstorm. 2. Roads in State of Disrepair If the road is in a bad condition or extremely rough because of an ongoing road resurfacing project or due to any building construction work nearby, it is paramount for a motorcycle rider to be extra careful. Such broken or bumpy road condition can cause a motorbike to ‘jump’ if the rider is not in full control of the vehicle, and lead to a crash. 3. Gravel on Pavement Gravel on the pavement can be a precarious road hazard for motorcyclists, more so when navigating a corner. Winding roads are often more likely to have gravel on pavement. Such roads require more cornering and are also favored by motorcycle riders because they are fun to navigate. However, motorcycle riders who lack the awareness and skills to deal with such roads and those who like to ride at higher speeds are more prone to accidents caused by gravel since it undermines the grip the tires have with the road. 4. Edge Break An edge break refers to a pair of traffic lanes that are situated at varying heights. This does not pose a problem for car drivers because of their strong center of gravity, but for motorcyclists, especially those travelling at a high speed along the freeway, it can be very risky. Even the slightest variation in height can result in the rider losing control causing him or her to crash. 5. Expansion Joint The strip of road that joins together two road sections or a segment of the road to a bridge is called an expansion joint. The joints are designed in such a way as to allow the road to shrink or expand without rupturing. But the resulting bumpy surface can increase the risk of motorcycle crashes. It is also possible that wet weather makes these surfaces more slippery and dangerous. 6. Open Bridge Joints The support required to keep together two bridge sections is provided by open bridge joints. Motorcyclists can sometimes find it difficult to navigate bridge joints that are extremely wide. If the rider is already aware of this potential hazard, they can be more cautious at such points and ride defensively. 7. Stray Animal on the Road A motorcyclist can veer off the road or get thrown off balance, if they hit a stray animal. It is virtually impossible to predict if and when an animal will come running onto the path. Swerving in an attempt to avoid hitting the animal can lead to a motorcycle crash. Large-sized animals (such as a deer) can post even greater risk to motorcyclists. In areas that are populated with these animals, the motorcyclist should exercise more caution. 8. Water Puddles, Ice, and Snow Certain types of (or worn) motorcycle tires might produce a hydroplaning effect when the vehicle passes through a water puddle. This can be risky for the rider as it decreases the friction between the tire and the road. Ice and snow also present greater danger for motorcyclists for the same reason than drivers of other types of vehicles. 9. Railway Tracks and Crossing A serious accident may take place if the tires of a motorcycle lose traction on railway tracks. Wood or metal pieces are sometimes noticeable between the tracks at some railway crossing points. When the weather is wet, these spots can turn extremely slippery for a motorcycle rider. 10. Debris or Objects Various types of debris or items strewn on the road (including objects that may have fallen off a truck such as furniture, tools, or boxes) can prove more dangerous for motorcycles than cars. Tree branches, rocks, and bits of tire tread can also create hazards on the road. These objects may not only cause the rider to slip, but they may also strike the rider, sending him or her off-balance and causing a crash. Unexpected Bumps in the Road can be Dangerous Sometimes, heavy vehicles passing on a road can push the tar up and lead to a series of bumps or humps to form in the midst of a lane. This hazard may appear as an elongated or raised seam, or a lateral series of bumps, which can be perilous to a motorcycle. These bumps may affect the motorcycle’s steering and suspension. A major road bump can cause the front wheel of the motorcycle to lift off the ground and swerve the bike to either side, potentially into oncoming traffic or into a bush. Such bumps and humps can be difficult to spot. They may not produce a shadow (except when the sun is really low), making them almost invisible to the rider. When moving in sync with traffic, motorcyclists should be alert and observe any cars ahead bouncing at any particular spot. This may indicate that there is a pothole ahead, and the rider should be prepared to take preventive action. However, such warning signs may not exist where the humps or bumps are found in the middle of a lane. Many vehicles will pass over them from either side with ease, leaving no indication for the trailing motorcyclist. Furthermore, when riding behind a large vehicle such as a truck, much of the road area in front is likely obscured. If this happens, the rider might unexpectedly find a bump appearing from beneath that vehicle. One of the challenges is that the transportation authorities may not be aware of bumps that do not cause a problem for most vehicles (because few or no complaints are made). The danger may not be identified and remedied until a motorcycle crash has already occurred. Thus, it is important to be alert and constantly search the roadway for bumps and other hazards. Never forget that motorcycles are different from cars. They need to be balanced on two tires with equal weight distribution to remain upright. Roadway hazards can upset that balance and cause a fatal crash. Blind Spot Safety Tips for Motorcycle Riders Many motorcycle crashes today are caused by other motorists on the road. For example. other motorists often-times fail to watch for and see motorcyclists traveling in their blind spots. Thus, it is vital that the motorcyclist be aware of this risk and take safety measures. Here are a few tips to improve motorcycle blind spot safety: Ensure there is a safety buffer surrounding you always. You can do this by maintain sufficient distance in front of you and providing enough space for carrying out safety maneuvers. Try to stay away from blind spots formed by a vehicle’s body pillars. Be conscious about blind spot risks when overtaking other vehicles. When traveling in a group, make sure to maintain a safe distance and move in a staggered formation. Make use of reflective clothing and tape for higher visibility. In a situation where another car is encroaching upon your safety zone, tap your brakes lightly. If the motorist refuses to respect your space, consider pulling off the road to let the vehicle pass. How to Minimize Risk on Intersections? Intersections pose the highest risk for motorcycle riders. When approaching an intersection, watch for vehicles switching lanes or making left turns ahead. Do not assume your right of way will be respected. Also, be on the lookout for gravel, oil, and debris on the road at intersections. Stay watchful of surfaces that might be uneven. At spots where there are traffic lights, be alert for vehicles that may suddenly stop (or that may not stop quickly enough). One way of managing intersection risks is to anticipate what another vehicle might do. Assume the worst and put yourself in the best position to avoid the potential hazard. For example, when you see another vehicle approaching the intersection, reduce speed and marginally move to away from the vehicle within your lane (assuming it is safe to do so). When a vehicle approaches from the right, move to the left within your lane, and vice versa. This gives you additional time and space to react, if required. The objective is to be ready without overreacting to a situation on the intersection. Overreacting to a potential hazard may cause a crash as well.
Motorcycle Road Hazards to Be Aware of
Added: 6-20-2018
calendar link contact Link recomend link
Copyright © 2018 - Ozark Rides, All Rights Reserved
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Free Initial Consultation Toll Free: (877) 418-1652 (479) 888-5268 Se Habla Español
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Living on the edge is part of what makes riding a motorcycle so gratifying.  But when your safety is on the line, do you know everything you should about when it’s important to play by the rules?  You can learn a lot about motorcycle safety from a safety course, and we certainly suggest every rider take one.  However, there’s a lot to be learned from experienced riders that you might not pick up in a safety course.  That’s why we’ve compiled this list for you that includes 10 motorcycle safety tips from some of the industry’s top professionals.  Keep reading…they may just change the way you ride!
10 Motorcycle Safety Tips all Riders Should Know
1. Take a motorcycle safety course Some states including Missouri and Arkansas require a skills test before getting a motorcycle license, and some also need a motorcycle safety course.  Even if your state doesn't require you to take a motorcycle safety class, you should seriously consider it. The course will teach you about the traffic laws that apply to motorcycles in your state, how to react to emergency situations on a motorcycle and will give you the opportunity to try out your new experiences in a controlled environment. 2. Get ready to roll Before each ride, do a swift walk-around to make sure your horn, light and directional signals are working correctly.  Check the belt, chain or shaft and the brakes.  Check the tires for wear and make sure they are set at the proper pressure. 3. Always wear a helmet Pick a helmet that is approved by DOT (Federal Government's Department of Transportation) for the best protection.  Modern models are comfortable and lightweight without sacrificing on safety.  Be prepared to spend quite a bit on your helmet.  You cannot put a price on your life, so it is worth the high cost. 4. Wear the right riding gear Those sandals and shorts may be comfortable, but they're a recipe for disaster when riding a motorcycle.  If you slide out, your feet are going to be in for a world of pain.  And those shorts won't provide your legs with much protection either. 5. Ride defensively When you leave the house for a ride, ALWAYS assume that everyone is out to get you!  That may sound a little like paranoia, but think of it this way… That car you meet at an intersection or the one that is approaching you on a lonely two lane back road, or any other interaction with traffic, just assume they don't see you.  Always be prepared in your mind to take defensive measures.  With time this will become second nature and you’ll stay safe. 6. Never ride tired Never ride tired.  And we mean NEVER!  Stop every 75-125 miles. Every rider knows their tolerance.  And we all seem to like to push it.  Set your rule. Stop.  Stretch.  Refresh yourself and your brain. 7. Always look where you want to go If you are looking at a curb, you're most likely going to hit the curb.  If your looking off the cliff you don't want to ride off of, you’re bound to freak out and hit the brakes or go over the edge. If traffic suddenly stops and you're staring at the cars in front of you, you may become their new rear bumper. Instead, look for a clear spot, look through the turn, look where you want to go... it never fails and will keep you confident and up on two wheels. 8. Leave room for an escape route When you come to a signal and stop, stay in gear and watch the traffic coming up behind you.  Always leave room for an escape route. 9. Maintain a good speed Speed limits exist for a reason, and all roads and routes have different ones.  Make sure to remain within that limit to dodge dangers.  Use basic sense while addressing a report on your speed.  If the path is empty and wide without traffic, it is okay to ride at top speed as per the limit set for that road. 10. Respect all traffic laws on the road Most of the accidents that occur on roads are the result of reckless driving and disregard of traffic rules.  The latter represent the guidelines on how we should operate on the road and ignoring them puts you at a risk of being involved in an accident. Final notes Remember: when you are on a motorcycle, you're the only one on the road watching out for you.  If your mind and emotions are anyplace other than the road ahead, you're susceptible to executing rookie errors that can end in a crash, injuries or worse. when the above tips are considered and implemented by motorcycle riders, accidents are less likely to happen. There is a good number of riders out there with years of riding experience that have never been involved in a motorbike accident thanks to their discipline and ethics.  Have a safe journey.  Always.
10 Tips Safety Course
Added: 5-7-2018
Motorcycle crashes are frequently caused due to road hazards. Seemingly minor obstacles on the road such as a wet pavement, small objects, debris, and road surfaces that are uneven typically pose little risk to cars and other automobiles. But they can prove dangerous to bikers and lead to grievous motorcycle accidents and injuries. This is why it is important for motorcyclists to have a clear idea of what all may count as a road hazard. Motorcycle riders need to watch out for these dangers and adopt safeguards against them. 1. Slippery or Slick Surfaces There are quite a few surfaces and objects that are or may turn slippery. Surfaces that are slippery and slick can prove a greater risk to motorcycle riders than drivers of other vehicles. This is because the two-wheeled bike design makes it a less stable driving machine. Furthermore, due to its lighter and smaller size, the motorcycle can slide a considerable distance if it slips on the road, and a crash with another vehicle or a stationary object is more likely. A slick surface can prove particularly risky when the motorcyclist is taking a turn at speed. Here are some types of debris and surfaces that can be slippery, especially during wet conditions: Leaves Crosswalk lines Anti-freeze liquid or oil Trolley tracks Other painted surfaces When a dry spell is followed by rain, it is important for motorcycle riders to be careful. Driving any vehicle is difficult in the first drizzle or rain on a sun-baked road. This is because the water blends with the mud and oil on the road to form a slippery coating. The riskiest time to drive a motorcycle on a road is within the first half hour of a rainstorm. 2. Roads in State of Disrepair If the road is in a bad condition or extremely rough because of an ongoing road resurfacing project or due to any building construction work nearby, it is paramount for a motorcycle rider to be extra careful. Such broken or bumpy road condition can cause a motorbike to ‘jump’ if the rider is not in full control of the vehicle, and lead to a crash. 3. Gravel on Pavement Gravel on the pavement can be a precarious road hazard for motorcyclists, more so when navigating a corner. Winding roads are often more likely to have gravel on pavement. Such roads require more cornering and are also favored by motorcycle riders because they are fun to navigate. However, motorcycle riders who lack the awareness and skills to deal with such roads and those who like to ride at higher speeds are more prone to accidents caused by gravel since it undermines the grip the tires have with the road. 4. Edge Break An edge break refers to a pair of traffic lanes that are situated at varying heights. This does not pose a problem for car drivers because of their strong center of gravity, but for motorcyclists, especially those travelling at a high speed along the freeway, it can be very risky. Even the slightest variation in height can result in the rider losing control causing him or her to crash. 5. Expansion Joint The strip of road that joins together two road sections or a segment of the road to a bridge is called an expansion joint. The joints are designed in such a way as to allow the road to shrink or expand without rupturing. But the resulting bumpy surface can increase the risk of motorcycle crashes. It is also possible that wet weather makes these surfaces more slippery and dangerous. 6. Open Bridge Joints The support required to keep together two bridge sections is provided by open bridge joints. Motorcyclists can sometimes find it difficult to navigate bridge joints that are extremely wide. If the rider is already aware of this potential hazard, they can be more cautious at such points and ride defensively. 7. Stray Animal on the Road A motorcyclist can veer off the road or get thrown off balance, if they hit a stray animal. It is virtually impossible to predict if and when an animal will come running onto the path. Swerving in an attempt to avoid hitting the animal can lead to a motorcycle crash. Large-sized animals (such as a deer) can post even greater risk to motorcyclists. In areas that are populated with these animals, the motorcyclist should exercise more caution. 8. Water Puddles, Ice, and Snow Certain types of (or worn) motorcycle tires might produce a hydroplaning effect when the vehicle passes through a water puddle. This can be risky for the rider as it decreases the friction between the tire and the road. Ice and snow also present greater danger for motorcyclists for the same reason than drivers of other types of vehicles. 9. Railway Tracks and Crossing A serious accident may take place if the tires of a motorcycle lose traction on railway tracks. Wood or metal pieces are sometimes noticeable between the tracks at some railway crossing points. When the weather is wet, these spots can turn extremely slippery for a motorcycle rider. 10. Debris or Objects Various types of debris or items strewn on the road (including objects that may have fallen off a truck such as furniture, tools, or boxes) can prove more dangerous for motorcycles than cars. Tree branches, rocks, and bits of tire tread can also create hazards on the road. These objects may not only cause the rider to slip, but they may also strike the rider, sending him or her off-balance and causing a crash. Unexpected Bumps in the Road can be Dangerous Sometimes, heavy vehicles passing on a road can push the tar up and lead to a series of bumps or humps to form in the midst of a lane. This hazard may appear as an elongated or raised seam, or a lateral series of bumps, which can be perilous to a motorcycle. These bumps may affect the motorcycle’s steering and suspension. A major road bump can cause the front wheel of the motorcycle to lift off the ground and swerve the bike to either side, potentially into oncoming traffic or into a bush. Such bumps and humps can be difficult to spot. They may not produce a shadow (except when the sun is really low), making them almost invisible to the rider. When moving in sync with traffic, motorcyclists should be alert and observe any cars ahead bouncing at any particular spot. This may indicate that there is a pothole ahead, and the rider should be prepared to take preventive action. However, such warning signs may not exist where the humps or bumps are found in the middle of a lane. Many vehicles will pass over them from either side with ease, leaving no indication for the trailing motorcyclist. Furthermore, when riding behind a large vehicle such as a truck, much of the road area in front is likely obscured. If this happens, the rider might unexpectedly find a bump appearing from beneath that vehicle. One of the challenges is that the transportation authorities may not be aware of bumps that do not cause a problem for most vehicles (because few or no complaints are made). The danger may not be identified and remedied until a motorcycle crash has already occurred. Thus, it is important to be alert and constantly search the roadway for bumps and other hazards. Never forget that motorcycles are different from cars. They need to be balanced on two tires with equal weight distribution to remain upright. Roadway hazards can upset that balance and cause a fatal crash. Blind Spot Safety Tips for Motorcycle Riders Many motorcycle crashes today are caused by other motorists on the road. For example. other motorists often-times fail to watch for and see motorcyclists traveling in their blind spots. Thus, it is vital that the motorcyclist be aware of this risk and take safety measures. Here are a few tips to improve motorcycle blind spot safety: Ensure there is a safety buffer surrounding you always. You can do this by maintain sufficient distance in front of you and providing enough space for carrying out safety maneuvers. Try to stay away from blind spots formed by a vehicle’s body pillars. Be conscious about blind spot risks when overtaking other vehicles. When traveling in a group, make sure to maintain a safe distance and move in a staggered formation. Make use of reflective clothing and tape for higher visibility. In a situation where another car is encroaching upon your safety zone, tap your brakes lightly. If the motorist refuses to respect your space, consider pulling off the road to let the vehicle pass. How to Minimize Risk on Intersections? Intersections pose the highest risk for motorcycle riders. When approaching an intersection, watch for vehicles switching lanes or making left turns ahead. Do not assume your right of way will be respected. Also, be on the lookout for gravel, oil, and debris on the road at intersections. Stay watchful of surfaces that might be uneven. At spots where there are traffic lights, be alert for vehicles that may suddenly stop (or that may not stop quickly enough). One way of managing intersection risks is to anticipate what another vehicle might do. Assume the worst and put yourself in the best position to avoid the potential hazard. For example, when you see another vehicle approaching the intersection, reduce speed and marginally move to away from the vehicle within your lane (assuming it is safe to do so). When a vehicle approaches from the right, move to the left within your lane, and vice versa. This gives you additional time and space to react, if required. The objective is to be ready without overreacting to a situation on the intersection. Overreacting to a potential hazard may cause a crash as well.
Motorcycle Road Hazards to Be Aware of
Added: 6-20-2018
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