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Living on the edge is part of what makes riding a motorcycle so gratifying.  But when your safety is on the line, do you know everything you should about when it’s important to play by the rules?  You can learn a lot about motorcycle safety from a safety course, and we certainly suggest every rider take one. However, there’s a lot to be learned from experienced riders that you might not pick up in a safety course.  That’s why we’ve compiled this list for you that includes 10 motorcycle safety tips from some of the industry’s top professionals.  Keep reading…they may just change the way you ride!
10 Motorcycle Safety Tips all Riders Should Know
1. Take a motorcycle safety course Some states including Missouri and Arkansas require a skills test before getting a motorcycle license, and some also need a motorcycle safety course.  Even if your state doesn't require you to take a motorcycle safety class, you should seriously consider it. The course will teach you about the traffic laws that apply to motorcycles in your state, how to react to emergency situations on a motorcycle and will give you the opportunity to try out your new experiences in a controlled environment. 2. Get ready to roll Before each ride, do a swift walk-around to make sure your horn, light and directional signals are working correctly.  Check the belt, chain or shaft and the brakes.  Check the tires for wear and make sure they are set at the proper pressure. 3. Always wear a helmet Pick a helmet that is approved by DOT (Federal Government's Department of Transportation) for the best protection.  Modern models are comfortable and lightweight without sacrificing on safety.  Be prepared to spend quite a bit on your helmet.  You cannot put a price on your life, so it is worth the high cost. 4. Wear the right riding gear Those sandals and shorts may be comfortable, but they're a recipe for disaster when riding a motorcycle.  If you slide out, your feet are going to be in for a world of pain.  And those shorts won't provide your legs with much protection either. 5. Ride defensively When you leave the house for a ride, ALWAYS assume that everyone is out to get you!  That may sound a little like paranoia, but think of it this way… That car you meet at an intersection or the one that is approaching you on a lonely two lane back road, or any other interaction with traffic, just assume they don't see you.  Always be prepared in your mind to take defensive measures.  With time this will become second nature and you’ll stay safe. 6. Never ride tired Never ride tired.  And we mean NEVER!  Stop every 75-125 miles.  Every rider knows their tolerance.  And we all seem to like to push it.  Set your rule. Stop.  Stretch.  Refresh yourself and your brain. 7. Always look where you want to go If you are looking at a curb, you're most likely going to hit the curb.  If your looking off the cliff you don't want to ride off of, you’re bound to freak out and hit the brakes or go over the edge.  If traffic suddenly stops and you're staring at the cars in front of you, you may become their new rear bumper. Instead, look for a clear spot, look through the turn, look where you want to go... it never fails and will keep you confident and up on two wheels. 8. Leave room for an escape route When you come to a signal and stop, stay in gear and watch the traffic coming up behind you.  Always leave room for an escape route. 9. Maintain a good speed Speed limits exist for a reason, and all roads and routes have different ones.  Make sure to remain within that limit to dodge dangers.  Use basic sense while addressing a report on your speed.  If the path is empty and wide without traffic, it is okay to ride at top speed as per the limit set for that road. 10. Respect all traffic laws on the road Most of the accidents that occur on roads are the result of reckless driving and disregard of traffic rules.  The latter represent the guidelines on how we should operate on the road and ignoring them puts you at a risk of being involved in an accident. Final notes Remember: when you are on a motorcycle, you're the only one on the road watching out for you.  If your mind and emotions are anyplace other than the road ahead, you're susceptible to executing rookie errors that can end in a crash, injuries or worse.  when the above tips are considered and implemented by motorcycle riders, accidents are less likely to happen. There is a good number of riders out there with years of riding experience that have never been involved in a motorbike accident thanks to their discipline and ethics.  Have a safe journey.  Always.
10 Tips Safety Course
Added: 5-7-2018
Motorcycle crashes are frequently caused due to road hazards. Seemingly minor obstacles on the road such as a wet pavement, small objects, debris, and road surfaces that are uneven typically pose little risk to cars and other automobiles. But they can prove dangerous to bikers and lead to grievous motorcycle accidents and injuries. This is why it is important for motorcyclists to have a clear idea of what all may count as a road hazard. Motorcycle riders need to watch out for these dangers and adopt safeguards against them. 1. Slippery or Slick Surfaces There are quite a few surfaces and objects that are or may turn slippery. Surfaces that are slippery and slick can prove a greater risk to motorcycle riders than drivers of other vehicles. This is because the two-wheeled bike design makes it a less stable driving machine. Furthermore, due to its lighter and smaller size, the motorcycle can slide a considerable distance if it slips on the road, and a crash with another vehicle or a stationary object is more likely. A slick surface can prove particularly risky when the motorcyclist is taking a turn at speed. Here are some types of debris and surfaces that can be slippery, especially during wet conditions: Leaves Crosswalk lines Anti-freeze liquid or oil Trolley tracks Other painted surfaces When a dry spell is followed by rain, it is important for motorcycle riders to be careful. Driving any vehicle is difficult in the first drizzle or rain on a sun-baked road. This is because the water blends with the mud and oil on the road to form a slippery coating. The riskiest time to drive a motorcycle on a road is within the first half hour of a rainstorm. 2. Roads in State of Disrepair If the road is in a bad condition or extremely rough because of an ongoing road resurfacing project or due to any building construction work nearby, it is paramount for a motorcycle rider to be extra careful. Such broken or bumpy road condition can cause a motorbike to ‘jump’ if the rider is not in full control of the vehicle, and lead to a crash. 3. Gravel on Pavement Gravel on the pavement can be a precarious road hazard for motorcyclists, more so when navigating a corner. Winding roads are often more likely to have gravel on pavement. Such roads require more cornering and are also favored by motorcycle riders because they are fun to navigate. However, motorcycle riders who lack the awareness and skills to deal with such roads and those who like to ride at higher speeds are more prone to accidents caused by gravel since it undermines the grip the tires have with the road. 4. Edge Break An edge break refers to a pair of traffic lanes that are situated at varying heights. This does not pose a problem for car drivers because of their strong center of gravity, but for motorcyclists, especially those travelling at a high speed along the freeway, it can be very risky. Even the slightest variation in height can result in the rider losing control causing him or her to crash. 5. Expansion Joint The strip of road that joins together two road sections or a segment of the road to a bridge is called an expansion joint. The joints are designed in such a way as to allow the road to shrink or expand without rupturing. But the resulting bumpy surface can increase the risk of motorcycle crashes. It is also possible that wet weather makes these surfaces more slippery and dangerous. 6. Open Bridge Joints The support required to keep together two bridge sections is provided by open bridge joints. Motorcyclists can sometimes find it difficult to navigate bridge joints that are extremely wide. If the rider is already aware of this potential hazard, they can be more cautious at such points and ride defensively. 7. Stray Animal on the Road A motorcyclist can veer off the road or get thrown off balance, if they hit a stray animal. It is virtually impossible to predict if and when an animal will come running onto the path. Swerving in an attempt to avoid hitting the animal can lead to a motorcycle crash. Large-sized animals (such as a deer) can post even greater risk to motorcyclists. In areas that are populated with these animals, the motorcyclist should exercise more caution. 8. Water Puddles, Ice, and Snow Certain types of (or worn) motorcycle tires might produce a hydroplaning effect when the vehicle passes through a water puddle. This can be risky for the rider as it decreases the friction between the tire and the road. Ice and snow also present greater danger for motorcyclists for the same reason than drivers of other types of vehicles. 9. Railway Tracks and Crossing A serious accident may take place if the tires of a motorcycle lose traction on railway tracks. Wood or metal pieces are sometimes noticeable between the tracks at some railway crossing points. When the weather is wet, these spots can turn extremely slippery for a motorcycle rider. 10. Debris or Objects Various types of debris or items strewn on the road (including objects that may have fallen off a truck such as furniture, tools, or boxes) can prove more dangerous for motorcycles than cars. Tree branches, rocks, and bits of tire tread can also create hazards on the road. These objects may not only cause the rider to slip, but they may also strike the rider, sending him or her off-balance and causing a crash. Unexpected Bumps in the Road can be Dangerous Sometimes, heavy vehicles passing on a road can push the tar up and lead to a series of bumps or humps to form in the midst of a lane. This hazard may appear as an elongated or raised seam, or a lateral series of bumps, which can be perilous to a motorcycle. These bumps may affect the motorcycle’s steering and suspension. A major road bump can cause the front wheel of the motorcycle to lift off the ground and swerve the bike to either side, potentially into oncoming traffic or into a bush. Such bumps and humps can be difficult to spot. They may not produce a shadow (except when the sun is really low), making them almost invisible to the rider. When moving in sync with traffic, motorcyclists should be alert and observe any cars ahead bouncing at any particular spot. This may indicate that there is a pothole ahead, and the rider should be prepared to take preventive action. However, such warning signs may not exist where the humps or bumps are found in the middle of a lane. Many vehicles will pass over them from either side with ease, leaving no indication for the trailing motorcyclist. Furthermore, when riding behind a large vehicle such as a truck, much of the road area in front is likely obscured. If this happens, the rider might unexpectedly find a bump appearing from beneath that vehicle. One of the challenges is that the transportation authorities may not be aware of bumps that do not cause a problem for most vehicles (because few or no complaints are made). The danger may not be identified and remedied until a motorcycle crash has already occurred. Thus, it is important to be alert and constantly search the roadway for bumps and other hazards. Never forget that motorcycles are different from cars. They need to be balanced on two tires with equal weight distribution to remain upright. Roadway hazards can upset that balance and cause a fatal crash. Blind Spot Safety Tips for Motorcycle Riders Many motorcycle crashes today are caused by other motorists on the road. For example. other motorists often-times fail to watch for and see motorcyclists traveling in their blind spots. Thus, it is vital that the motorcyclist be aware of this risk and take safety measures. Here are a few tips to improve motorcycle blind spot safety: Ensure there is a safety buffer surrounding you always. You can do this by maintain sufficient distance in front of you and providing enough space for carrying out safety maneuvers. Try to stay away from blind spots formed by a vehicle’s body pillars. Be conscious about blind spot risks when overtaking other vehicles. When traveling in a group, make sure to maintain a safe distance and move in a staggered formation. Make use of reflective clothing and tape for higher visibility. In a situation where another car is encroaching upon your safety zone, tap your brakes lightly. If the motorist refuses to respect your space, consider pulling off the road to let the vehicle pass. How to Minimize Risk on Intersections? Intersections pose the highest risk for motorcycle riders. When approaching an intersection, watch for vehicles switching lanes or making left turns ahead. Do not assume your right of way will be respected. Also, be on the lookout for gravel, oil, and debris on the road at intersections. Stay watchful of surfaces that might be uneven. At spots where there are traffic lights, be alert for vehicles that may suddenly stop (or that may not stop quickly enough). One way of managing intersection risks is to anticipate what another vehicle might do. Assume the worst and put yourself in the best position to avoid the potential hazard. For example, when you see another vehicle approaching the intersection, reduce speed and marginally move to away from the vehicle within your lane (assuming it is safe to do so). When a vehicle approaches from the right, move to the left within your lane, and vice versa. This gives you additional time and space to react, if required. The objective is to be ready without overreacting to a situation on the intersection. Overreacting to a potential hazard may cause a crash as well.
Motorcycle Road Hazards to Be Aware of
Added: 6-20-2018
10 Common Motorcycle Accidents and How To Avoid Them
Added: 8-12-2018
Riding a motorcycle is dangerous. Luckily, bikes also give you the best possible tools to avoid crashing, incredibly powerful brakes, obstruction-free vision, excellent handling and very grippy tires. Here’s how to use those tools, and your very own brain, to avoid one of these common motorcycle accidents. Motorcycle Safety: Want to reduce your odds of dying in a crash? Get educated. New riders should complete a basic rider course from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation or similar while advanced tuition is available at race tracks. It can be cheaper than you fear. Safety gear doesn’t just help prevent injury in a crash, it can also make riding more comfortable, put you in better control of your bike, and help you be seen by other drivers. Bright colors on your helmet and jacket/suit will help car drivers see you, potentially avoiding some of the common accidents detailed below. 1: A Car Turns Left In Front Of You The most common motorcycle accident. A car fails to see you or judges your speed incorrectly, turning in front of you at an intersection. Blame inattention, distraction, blind spots and even psychology; a driver looking for cars perceives merely an absence of cars, not the presence of a motorcycle. How To Avoid It: Simple, you just need to see it coming. Part of your job as a motorcyclist is to develop a precognitive sixth sense. Look for signs that could indicate someone may turn in front of you: a car is at an intersection waiting to turn, there’s a gap in traffic near an intersection, driveway or parking lot. In either situation, slow down, cover your brakes and get ready to take evasive action. Yes, you do need to take something as innocuous as a car waiting in a turn lane as a major and immediate threat to your life. You also need to account for objects outside of your vision. Gaps in traffic indicate the possibility of someone coming through that gap, even if you can’t see them. Again, MAJOR THREAT, PREPARE FOR EVASIVE ACTION. And once you’ve identified said threat, you can work it through levels of severity. Is the driver clearly able to see you, without obstruction from their window pillars, trees or signs? Is that person actually looking? Are they looking at you? How are they situated in the road? What is their speed? Where are their wheels pointing? Look at their wheels, not the car – they’ll give you the first clue of movement. During all this, also be aware of what’s behind and to your side. Should you need to take evasive action, you’ll need to know your routes of escape. It’s no good braking in time to avoid a turning car, only to be swatted from behind by a tailgating SUV. What’s the road surface like? Is it going to be able to handle the full force of your brakes or are you going to lock them? You do know how to use the full ability of your brakes, right? Under no circumstances should you “lay the bike down.” Your best chance of survival comes from shedding as much speed as possible pre-collision, and you’re going to be able to do that best with the bike completely upright, using both brakes. Even if you only have time to lose 10 or 20 mph, that could be the difference between going home with bruises and going home at all. 2: You Hit Gravel In A Blind Corner You’re out riding the twisties when, seemingly without warning, you round a corner to find a patch of sand/gravel/leaves/horse dung/whatever in your path. You put your front tire in it and wipe out. How To Avoid It: Don’t hit it in the first place. Ride at a pace where your reaction time and ability to take action fit within your range of vision. On the road, “Slow In, Fast Out” is an effective rule of thumb. Enter a corner wide, to increase your vision and at an easy pace. You can pick up the speed on the way out, once you can see. Trail braking is a slightly more advanced skill that you’ll need to learn and practice on a track before applying on the road. Using it, you brake all the way to the apex using the front brake before swapping brake for throttle. Since you’re already on the brakes and the bike’s weight is distributed forward, compressing the front suspension and increasing the size of the front tire’s contact patch, you can easily tighten your line by applying a little more brake or widen it by letting off. Doing so should help you avoid obstacles such as gravel. Another advanced skill, which is oddly controversial in rule-loving America, but which is taught by advanced police riders abroad, is to maximize vision by using the full width of the road, regardless of lanes. Vision equals safety equals speed. Again, learn this from a trained professional before trying it yourself. 3: You Entered A Corner Too Fast And now it’s unexpectedly tightening and you’re just not going to make it around. Oh no. How To Avoid It: Don’t be a dummy. Only ride as fast as you can see and use visual clues like telephone polls and signs to judge a road’s direction, even if that road is disappearing over a blind crest. If you do find yourself going too fast in a corner, the best approach is to trust the bike and try to ride it out. The bike is likely more capable than you are, so it’s really you that’s not capable of making it around. Take as much lean out of the bike as possible by hanging off, look where you want to go and be as smooth as possible on the controls. Do not whack on the brakes, chop the throttle or do anything else that may upset the bike and cause a loss of traction. Don’t panic if a peg or knee or something else touches down, just try to hold that lean angle, look for the corner exit and ride it out. This is another situation in which trail braking can be a real help, allowing you to safely shed speed while already in the corner. 4: A Car Changes Lane Into You You’re riding in traffic when a car in another lane suddenly veers into the space you’re occupying. Remember, our tiny motorcycles can easily fit into blind spots and drivers looking for cars aren’t psychologically programmed to see motorcycles. How To Avoid It: Be aware of where blind spots lie and spend as little time in them as possible. If you can see a driver's eyes in their mirrors, then they have the ability to see you, too (But remember that still doesn't always mean they're looking). Beware of situations where lane changes become more possible. Is highway traffic slowing, with one lane moving faster than others? People are going to want to be in that lane. Don’t be where they want to be. Look for signs of a car changing lanes: turn signals, wheels turning, the car wandering around its own lane while the driver checks his/her mirrors and, of course, the driver’s head moving. Be aware of all that, in all the cars around you, at all times, and you’ll be good. 5: A Car Hits You From Behind You come to a halt a stop sign/cross walk/intersection/to avoid a family of baby ducks when, the driver behind you doesn’t see you or isn’t trying to and plows into you at high speed. The most common car accident is a “fender bender.” A fender bender can kill a motorcyclist. How To Avoid It: Use cars as your very own crumple zone. A single car stopped at a multi-lane stoplight, with more cars coming from behind? Pull in front of it (wave nicely) and you’re cushioned from any subsequent impacts. Between a line of cars works just as well. No free crumple zones available? Stop to the side rather than the center of a lane, rapidly flash your brake light by tapping a brake lever, keep the bike in gear and your right hand on the throttle. Pay attention to what’s coming up behind you and be prepared to scoot away should it appear someone’s about to come plowing into you. Be particularly aware in situations where there’s bad visibility, at times when drunk driving is prevalent (do all the bars around you let out at 1am?) and when stops are unexpected, such as at pedestrian crosswalks on very busy streets and stuff like those cute baby ducks crossing the road. 6: Your Riding Buddies Are Idiots You’ve seen it happen. A group is out for a ride when one of them stops suddenly or something similar. His buddy is too busy daydreaming to realize and hits him from behind. This has happened to us; it can happen to anyone. How To Avoid It: Make sure everyone is aware of proper group riding etiquette and knows to ride in a staggered formation. You’d be amazed how many people are unaware of this simple technique. Doing so increases vision and moves bikes out of line with each other, meaning a temporary lapse in attention wont’ result in a collision. Pick smarter riding buddies or do what I do: ride alone. 7: You Locked The Front Brake Oh no, a deer/cute girl/cop/stopped traffic. You grab a fistful of front brake and, next thing you know, you’re lying on the ground, watching your bike cartwheel down the street. How To Avoid It: Learn to use your front brake. It might seem counterintuitive, but that front brake is the most powerful and difficult-to-master component on your motorcycle; it can alter your speed much more quickly than your engine. If you’re just learning to ride, have simply never mastered this skill or bought a new bike and need to learn it, find a big, empty parking lot and start practicing. From a set speed (say, 30 mph), start braking at a certain mark, then repeat ad infinitum until you’ve reduced your braking distance as much as possible. You should be able to feel the tire on the very edge of locking up and the rear wheel lifting off the ground. Then go and practice at higher and higher speeds until you can employ the maximum braking ability of your motorcycle reliably and safely. Or just buy a bike with ABS, remember you have it, and squeeze the lever as hard as you can when you need to make an emergency stop. 8: A Car Opened Its Door The biggest gap in traffic was between a line of parked cars and a stationary line of active traffic. So you go scooting through it when, all of a sudden, Nathan-no-look swings his door wide open right in front of you. How To Avoid It: Never, ever, ever, ever ride between an active traffic lane and parked cars. Not just because of the opening doors thing, but because pedestrians step out, cars pull out so they can see, and for a million other reasons. Just don’t do it. If you do, somehow, find yourself in a door-opening situation though, follow all the advice above and brake as hard as possible. Even if a collision is inevitable, shedding even a small fraction of your speed can really help. Riders call the area next to parked cars, within a door's width “The Death Zone” for a reason. 9: It’s Slippery! Stuff is coming out of the sky! That stuff is cold, wet and, surprise surprise, slippery. Listen to experienced wet weather riders and don’t panic. How To Avoid It: Does your bike have decent tires on it or were you silly and decided that running track rubber on the road was a good idea? Hint: it’s not. So long as you’re running reasonable tires and those tires aren’t worn out, you’ll be surprised at how well a motorcycle does in wet or even snowy conditions. Just slow down and be as smooth as possible on the controls. In the wet, stuff like manhole covers become super, extra slippery and you’ll need to watch out for oil and diesel on the road as well. Look for patches of rainbow and avoid those. If it hasn’t rained for a while, the first hour or so of rainfall is the most treacherous; it lifts all the oils and whatnot out of the pavement, floating it on top. Treat yourself to a hot cup of coffee and wait for a solid downpour to wash all that junk away. Also beware of the limited visibility rain creates for other drivers and their general ineptitude; car drivers don’t seem to understand that slippery conditions necessitate longer following distances and earlier braking. I advocate keeping revs up in the wet. The thinking is that, should your rear spin up, you’ll be using a smaller amount of throttle opening, allowing you to regain traction much easier than if you’re riding at 30mph in 6th, at wide open throttle. 10: The Most Common Bike Accident According to the Hurt Report — the largest study ever conducted on motorcycle accident causation — alcohol is a factor in 50 percent of all bike wrecks. How To Avoid It: Don’t drink and ride.
How To Choose The Right Kind Of Motorcycle Added 10/4/2018 A motorcycle is a two-wheeled motor vehicle used for an easy and fast way of transportation. It is relatively more prevalent in developing countries of the world because it is relatively cheap to maintain and operate. With the advancement in technology in recent years, the motorcycle is also specialized in multiple styles. Today’s motorcycle are much more advanced than the past. It is a token of happiness in the family. But this key of happiness is not in finding the best motorcycle available in the market rather than to find right kind of motorcycle for you which depends on upon your requirements and type of riding you want to do. Some motorcycles are specially designed keeping in mind the particular segment of the market while some are general and can be used by anyone. For e.g. some motorcycles are more suited for young generation than the older one and vice versa.  For a new rider, a lightweight motorcycle is always better while learning.  Similarly, it is always encouraging to place both the feet on the ground while stopping the motorcycle. Though the experienced rider can stop the motorcycle even by using one foot on the surface.  There are hundreds of models of motorcycles that are available in the market, and the user must narrow down their search to find the right kind of motorcycle. Choosing the Right Kind of Motorcycle    It is always a tough decision to choose the right kind of Motorcycle when so many styles and models are available in the market. In fact, I believe that one type of motorcycle is not enough to meet all the requirements of the rider. Therefore, while choosing the right kind of motorcycle for you, you must first analyse and review the basic purpose for which you will use the motorcycle. There are a lot of options available in the market and the decision primarily depends on upon what you want to do with the bike. It depends whether the rider wants to ride it on the road or off the road. Once the purpose of the motorcycle is decided on then only you can choose the right kind of motorcycle for you based on the below parameters: Analyse the reason of buying a motorcycle Types of roads on which you are mainly going to ride the motorcycle Budget of buying the motorcycle Five Basic Styles of Motorcycles There are different types of motorcycles available in the market. These can be broadly classified into five categories as follows: 1.  The Naked or Standard Bike This is the basic type of motorcycle which puts the user in an upright position but not able to cope with the blowing wind. Advantages of Standard bike   Standard Bike is available in variety of models with engine displacement It is easy to ride and controllable It is well-suited for the ride within the city which may or may not have an even surface. Disadvantages of Standard Bike Standard Bile is not able to cope with blowing wind It makes the rider tired when driving for long periods of time This type of motorcycle is ideally suited for daily commuter and who can use the motorcycle only occasionally for the long distance ride 2. Cruiser There are many companies that manufacture cruiser type of motorcycles. Advantages of Cruiser In Cruiser, riders are in more relaxed riding position Good Pickup – Most of the models of this type of motorcycle are 100 cc or more. It is highly comfortable for long rides This type of motorcycle consists of a windshield, luggage makes it a safe vehicle for long distance rides. It is primarily used for touring purposes. Disadvantages of Cruiser It is having more room for the leg. Therefore to reduce this, suspension has to be raised 3. Touring This type of motorcycle is designed in such a manner so that it remains comfortable for the rider when riding long distances. This type of vehicle is available with large displacement engines. Advantages of Touring Motorcycle Touring Motorcycle has more fuel and luggage capacity. Therefore, it can go for ong distances hassle-free It is equipped with windshield provides extra protection to the rider It is equipped with sound systems used for entertainment purpose during a long ride Disadvantages of Touring Motorcycle It is more expensive as compared to other types.  The price of this type of motorcycle is equivalent to the small car. Touring Motorcycle is also heavy in weight which makes it difficult for new riders. 4. Sport Bike It is another type of motorcycle primarily used for racing purpose. It is the legal version of motorcycle used for competition. Advantages of Sport Bike Riders can lean in the forward direction and ride it comfortably. High speed vehicle Excellent pickup. As this type of motorcycle is used for racing purpose, it normally comes in 600cc or more Disadvantages of Sport Bike It is not suited for new riders   5. Dual Purpose / Adventure Touring This is the last category of motorcycle used for dual purpose i.e. touring as well as for riding the normal motorcycle. Advantages of Dual Purpose Bike It is most versatile motorcycle among all the different categories of motorcycles available in the market Rider can ride the motorcycle in an upright position These are designed for different road conditions. For e.g. rider can easily ride dual purpose motorcycle in highway having smooth road as well as in         city having uneven surface, or even off road Disadvantages of Dual Purpose Bike It is not very comfortable while riding for long distance Conclusion The two most important points always need to be kept in mind to a new rider is light weight of the motorcycle and able to touch both feet on the ground while stopping. Luckily, seat height and weight of the motorcycle is always mentioned against each model as key features on the motorcycle manufactures website. Therefore, the rider can always glance at the given motorcycles specs carefully to find the right kind of motorcycle for your intended riding style.  Once you decide the purpose of usage of your motorcycle, the above guidelines will help you to find your dream motorcycle which will be the right fit for you.
** Harley-Davidson recalling 238,380 bikes for clutch problem ** The voluntary safety recall includes all model-year 2017 and 2018 Touring, Trike and CVO  Touring models, as well as some 2017 Softails.  Click here to see if your bike is being recalled.
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Living on the edge is part of what makes riding a motorcycle so gratifying.  But when your safety is on the line, do you know everything you should about when it’s important to play by the rules?  You can learn a lot about motorcycle safety from a safety course, and we certainly suggest every rider take one.  However, there’s a lot to be learned from experienced riders that you might not pick up in a safety course.  That’s why we’ve compiled this list for you that includes 10 motorcycle safety tips from some of the industry’s top professionals.  Keep reading…they may just change the way you ride!
10 Motorcycle Safety Tips all Riders Should Know
1. Take a motorcycle safety course Some states including Missouri and Arkansas require a skills test before getting a motorcycle license, and some also need a motorcycle safety course.  Even if your state doesn't require you to take a motorcycle safety class, you should seriously consider it. The course will teach you about the traffic laws that apply to motorcycles in your state, how to react to emergency situations on a motorcycle and will give you the opportunity to try out your new experiences in a controlled environment. 2. Get ready to roll Before each ride, do a swift walk-around to make sure your horn, light and directional signals are working correctly.  Check the belt, chain or shaft and the brakes.  Check the tires for wear and make sure they are set at the proper pressure. 3. Always wear a helmet Pick a helmet that is approved by DOT (Federal Government's Department of Transportation) for the best protection.  Modern models are comfortable and lightweight without sacrificing on safety.  Be prepared to spend quite a bit on your helmet.  You cannot put a price on your life, so it is worth the high cost. 4. Wear the right riding gear Those sandals and shorts may be comfortable, but they're a recipe for disaster when riding a motorcycle.  If you slide out, your feet are going to be in for a world of pain.  And those shorts won't provide your legs with much protection either. 5. Ride defensively When you leave the house for a ride, ALWAYS assume that everyone is out to get you!  That may sound a little like paranoia, but think of it this way… That car you meet at an intersection or the one that is approaching you on a lonely two lane back road, or any other interaction with traffic, just assume they don't see you.  Always be prepared in your mind to take defensive measures.  With time this will become second nature and you’ll stay safe. 6. Never ride tired Never ride tired.  And we mean NEVER!  Stop every 75-125 miles. Every rider knows their tolerance.  And we all seem to like to push it.  Set your rule. Stop.  Stretch.  Refresh yourself and your brain. 7. Always look where you want to go If you are looking at a curb, you're most likely going to hit the curb.  If your looking off the cliff you don't want to ride off of, you’re bound to freak out and hit the brakes or go over the edge. If traffic suddenly stops and you're staring at the cars in front of you, you may become their new rear bumper. Instead, look for a clear spot, look through the turn, look where you want to go... it never fails and will keep you confident and up on two wheels. 8. Leave room for an escape route When you come to a signal and stop, stay in gear and watch the traffic coming up behind you.  Always leave room for an escape route. 9. Maintain a good speed Speed limits exist for a reason, and all roads and routes have different ones.  Make sure to remain within that limit to dodge dangers.  Use basic sense while addressing a report on your speed.  If the path is empty and wide without traffic, it is okay to ride at top speed as per the limit set for that road. 10. Respect all traffic laws on the road Most of the accidents that occur on roads are the result of reckless driving and disregard of traffic rules.  The latter represent the guidelines on how we should operate on the road and ignoring them puts you at a risk of being involved in an accident. Final notes Remember: when you are on a motorcycle, you're the only one on the road watching out for you.  If your mind and emotions are anyplace other than the road ahead, you're susceptible to executing rookie errors that can end in a crash, injuries or worse. when the above tips are considered and implemented by motorcycle riders, accidents are less likely to happen. There is a good number of riders out there with years of riding experience that have never been involved in a motorbike accident thanks to their discipline and ethics.  Have a safe journey.  Always.
10 Tips Safety Course
Added: 5-7-2018
Motorcycle crashes are frequently caused due to road hazards. Seemingly minor obstacles on the road such as a wet pavement, small objects, debris, and road surfaces that are uneven typically pose little risk to cars and other automobiles. But they can prove dangerous to bikers and lead to grievous motorcycle accidents and injuries. This is why it is important for motorcyclists to have a clear idea of what all may count as a road hazard. Motorcycle riders need to watch out for these dangers and adopt safeguards against them. 1. Slippery or Slick Surfaces There are quite a few surfaces and objects that are or may turn slippery. Surfaces that are slippery and slick can prove a greater risk to motorcycle riders than drivers of other vehicles. This is because the two-wheeled bike design makes it a less stable driving machine. Furthermore, due to its lighter and smaller size, the motorcycle can slide a considerable distance if it slips on the road, and a crash with another vehicle or a stationary object is more likely. A slick surface can prove particularly risky when the motorcyclist is taking a turn at speed. Here are some types of debris and surfaces that can be slippery, especially during wet conditions: Leaves Crosswalk lines Anti-freeze liquid or oil Trolley tracks Other painted surfaces When a dry spell is followed by rain, it is important for motorcycle riders to be careful. Driving any vehicle is difficult in the first drizzle or rain on a sun-baked road. This is because the water blends with the mud and oil on the road to form a slippery coating. The riskiest time to drive a motorcycle on a road is within the first half hour of a rainstorm. 2. Roads in State of Disrepair If the road is in a bad condition or extremely rough because of an ongoing road resurfacing project or due to any building construction work nearby, it is paramount for a motorcycle rider to be extra careful. Such broken or bumpy road condition can cause a motorbike to ‘jump’ if the rider is not in full control of the vehicle, and lead to a crash. 3. Gravel on Pavement Gravel on the pavement can be a precarious road hazard for motorcyclists, more so when navigating a corner. Winding roads are often more likely to have gravel on pavement. Such roads require more cornering and are also favored by motorcycle riders because they are fun to navigate. However, motorcycle riders who lack the awareness and skills to deal with such roads and those who like to ride at higher speeds are more prone to accidents caused by gravel since it undermines the grip the tires have with the road. 4. Edge Break An edge break refers to a pair of traffic lanes that are situated at varying heights. This does not pose a problem for car drivers because of their strong center of gravity, but for motorcyclists, especially those travelling at a high speed along the freeway, it can be very risky. Even the slightest variation in height can result in the rider losing control causing him or her to crash. 5. Expansion Joint The strip of road that joins together two road sections or a segment of the road to a bridge is called an expansion joint. The joints are designed in such a way as to allow the road to shrink or expand without rupturing. But the resulting bumpy surface can increase the risk of motorcycle crashes. It is also possible that wet weather makes these surfaces more slippery and dangerous. 6. Open Bridge Joints The support required to keep together two bridge sections is provided by open bridge joints. Motorcyclists can sometimes find it difficult to navigate bridge joints that are extremely wide. If the rider is already aware of this potential hazard, they can be more cautious at such points and ride defensively. 7. Stray Animal on the Road A motorcyclist can veer off the road or get thrown off balance, if they hit a stray animal. It is virtually impossible to predict if and when an animal will come running onto the path. Swerving in an attempt to avoid hitting the animal can lead to a motorcycle crash. Large-sized animals (such as a deer) can post even greater risk to motorcyclists. In areas that are populated with these animals, the motorcyclist should exercise more caution. 8. Water Puddles, Ice, and Snow Certain types of (or worn) motorcycle tires might produce a hydroplaning effect when the vehicle passes through a water puddle. This can be risky for the rider as it decreases the friction between the tire and the road. Ice and snow also present greater danger for motorcyclists for the same reason than drivers of other types of vehicles. 9. Railway Tracks and Crossing A serious accident may take place if the tires of a motorcycle lose traction on railway tracks. Wood or metal pieces are sometimes noticeable between the tracks at some railway crossing points. When the weather is wet, these spots can turn extremely slippery for a motorcycle rider. 10. Debris or Objects Various types of debris or items strewn on the road (including objects that may have fallen off a truck such as furniture, tools, or boxes) can prove more dangerous for motorcycles than cars. Tree branches, rocks, and bits of tire tread can also create hazards on the road. These objects may not only cause the rider to slip, but they may also strike the rider, sending him or her off-balance and causing a crash. Unexpected Bumps in the Road can be Dangerous Sometimes, heavy vehicles passing on a road can push the tar up and lead to a series of bumps or humps to form in the midst of a lane. This hazard may appear as an elongated or raised seam, or a lateral series of bumps, which can be perilous to a motorcycle. These bumps may affect the motorcycle’s steering and suspension. A major road bump can cause the front wheel of the motorcycle to lift off the ground and swerve the bike to either side, potentially into oncoming traffic or into a bush. Such bumps and humps can be difficult to spot. They may not produce a shadow (except when the sun is really low), making them almost invisible to the rider. When moving in sync with traffic, motorcyclists should be alert and observe any cars ahead bouncing at any particular spot. This may indicate that there is a pothole ahead, and the rider should be prepared to take preventive action. However, such warning signs may not exist where the humps or bumps are found in the middle of a lane. Many vehicles will pass over them from either side with ease, leaving no indication for the trailing motorcyclist. Furthermore, when riding behind a large vehicle such as a truck, much of the road area in front is likely obscured. If this happens, the rider might unexpectedly find a bump appearing from beneath that vehicle. One of the challenges is that the transportation authorities may not be aware of bumps that do not cause a problem for most vehicles (because few or no complaints are made). The danger may not be identified and remedied until a motorcycle crash has already occurred. Thus, it is important to be alert and constantly search the roadway for bumps and other hazards. Never forget that motorcycles are different from cars. They need to be balanced on two tires with equal weight distribution to remain upright. Roadway hazards can upset that balance and cause a fatal crash. Blind Spot Safety Tips for Motorcycle Riders Many motorcycle crashes today are caused by other motorists on the road. For example. other motorists often-times fail to watch for and see motorcyclists traveling in their blind spots. Thus, it is vital that the motorcyclist be aware of this risk and take safety measures. Here are a few tips to improve motorcycle blind spot safety: Ensure there is a safety buffer surrounding you always. You can do this by maintain sufficient distance in front of you and providing enough space for carrying out safety maneuvers. Try to stay away from blind spots formed by a vehicle’s body pillars. Be conscious about blind spot risks when overtaking other vehicles. When traveling in a group, make sure to maintain a safe distance and move in a staggered formation. Make use of reflective clothing and tape for higher visibility. In a situation where another car is encroaching upon your safety zone, tap your brakes lightly. If the motorist refuses to respect your space, consider pulling off the road to let the vehicle pass. How to Minimize Risk on Intersections? Intersections pose the highest risk for motorcycle riders. When approaching an intersection, watch for vehicles switching lanes or making left turns ahead. Do not assume your right of way will be respected. Also, be on the lookout for gravel, oil, and debris on the road at intersections. Stay watchful of surfaces that might be uneven. At spots where there are traffic lights, be alert for vehicles that may suddenly stop (or that may not stop quickly enough). One way of managing intersection risks is to anticipate what another vehicle might do. Assume the worst and put yourself in the best position to avoid the potential hazard. For example, when you see another vehicle approaching the intersection, reduce speed and marginally move to away from the vehicle within your lane (assuming it is safe to do so). When a vehicle approaches from the right, move to the left within your lane, and vice versa. This gives you additional time and space to react, if required. The objective is to be ready without overreacting to a situation on the intersection. Overreacting to a potential hazard may cause a crash as well.
Motorcycle Road Hazards to Be Aware of
Added: 6-20-2018
10 Common Motorcycle Accidents and How To Avoid Them
Added: 8-12-2018
Riding a motorcycle is dangerous. Luckily, bikes also give you the best possible tools to avoid crashing, incredibly powerful brakes, obstruction-free vision, excellent handling and very grippy tires. Here’s how to use those tools, and your very own brain, to avoid one of these common motorcycle accidents. Motorcycle Safety: Want to reduce your odds of dying in a crash? Get educated. New riders should complete a basic rider course from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation or similar while advanced tuition is available at race tracks. It can be cheaper than you fear. Safety gear doesn’t just help prevent injury in a crash, it can also make riding more comfortable, put you in better control of your bike, and help you be seen by other drivers. Bright colors on your helmet and jacket/suit will help car drivers see you, potentially avoiding some of the common accidents detailed below. 1: A Car Turns Left In Front Of You The most common motorcycle accident. A car fails to see you or judges your speed incorrectly, turning in front of you at an intersection. Blame inattention, distraction, blind spots and even psychology; a driver looking for cars perceives merely an absence of cars, not the presence of a motorcycle. How To Avoid It: Simple, you just need to see it coming. Part of your job as a motorcyclist is to develop a precognitive sixth sense. Look for signs that could indicate someone may turn in front of you: a car is at an intersection waiting to turn, there’s a gap in traffic near an intersection, driveway or parking lot. In either situation, slow down, cover your brakes and get ready to take evasive action. Yes, you do need to take something as innocuous as a car waiting in a turn lane as a major and immediate threat to your life. You also need to account for objects outside of your vision. Gaps in traffic indicate the possibility of someone coming through that gap, even if you can’t see them. Again, MAJOR THREAT, PREPARE FOR EVASIVE ACTION. And once you’ve identified said threat, you can work it through levels of severity. Is the driver clearly able to see you, without obstruction from their window pillars, trees or signs? Is that person actually looking? Are they looking at you? How are they situated in the road? What is their speed? Where are their wheels pointing? Look at their wheels, not the car – they’ll give you the first clue of movement. During all this, also be aware of what’s behind and to your side. Should you need to take evasive action, you’ll need to know your routes of escape. It’s no good braking in time to avoid a turning car, only to be swatted from behind by a tailgating SUV. What’s the road surface like? Is it going to be able to handle the full force of your brakes or are you going to lock them? You do know how to use the full ability of your brakes, right? Under no circumstances should you “lay the bike down.” Your best chance of survival comes from shedding as much speed as possible pre-collision, and you’re going to be able to do that best with the bike completely upright, using both brakes. Even if you only have time to lose 10 or 20 mph, that could be the difference between going home with bruises and going home at all. 2: You Hit Gravel In A Blind Corner You’re out riding the twisties when, seemingly without warning, you round a corner to find a patch of sand/gravel/leaves/horse dung/ whatever in your path. You put your front tire in it and wipe out. How To Avoid It: Don’t hit it in the first place. Ride at a pace where your reaction time and ability to take action fit within your range of vision. On the road, “Slow In, Fast Out” is an effective rule of thumb. Enter a corner wide, to increase your vision and at an easy pace. You can pick up the speed on the way out, once you can see. Trail braking is a slightly more advanced skill that you’ll need to learn and practice on a track before applying on the road. Using it, you brake all the way to the apex using the front brake before swapping brake for throttle. Since you’re already on the brakes and the bike’s weight is distributed forward, compressing the front suspension and increasing the size of the front tire’s contact patch, you can easily tighten your line by applying a little more brake or widen it by letting off. Doing so should help you avoid obstacles such as gravel. Another advanced skill, which is oddly controversial in rule-loving America, but which is taught by advanced police riders abroad, is to maximize vision by using the full width of the road, regardless of lanes. Vision equals safety equals speed. Again, learn this from a trained professional before trying it yourself. 3: You Entered A Corner Too Fast And now it’s unexpectedly tightening and you’re just not going to make it around. Oh no. How To Avoid It: Don’t be a dummy. Only ride as fast as you can see and use visual clues like telephone polls and signs to judge a road’s direction, even if that road is disappearing over a blind crest. If you do find yourself going too fast in a corner, the best approach is to trust the bike and try to ride it out. The bike is likely more capable than you are, so it’s really you that’s not capable of making it around. Take as much lean out of the bike as possible by hanging off, look where you want to go and be as smooth as possible on the controls. Do not whack on the brakes, chop the throttle or do anything else that may upset the bike and cause a loss of traction. Don’t panic if a peg or knee or something else touches down, just try to hold that lean angle, look for the corner exit and ride it out. This is another situation in which trail braking can be a real help, allowing you to safely shed speed while already in the corner. 4: A Car Changes Lane Into You You’re riding in traffic when a car in another lane suddenly veers into the space you’re occupying. Remember, our tiny motorcycles can easily fit into blind spots and drivers looking for cars aren’t psychologically programmed to see motorcycles. How To Avoid It: Be aware of where blind spots lie and spend as little time in them as possible. If you can see a driver's eyes in their mirrors, then they have the ability to see you, too (But remember that still doesn't always mean they're looking). Beware of situations where lane changes become more possible. Is highway traffic slowing, with one lane moving faster than others? People are going to want to be in that lane. Don’t be where they want to be. Look for signs of a car changing lanes: turn signals, wheels turning, the car wandering around its own lane while the driver checks his/her mirrors and, of course, the driver’s head moving. Be aware of all that, in all the cars around you, at all times, and you’ll be good. 5: A Car Hits You From Behind You come to a halt a stop sign/cross walk/intersection/to avoid a family of baby ducks when, the driver behind you doesn’t see you or isn’t trying to and plows into you at high speed. The most common car accident is a “fender bender.” A fender bender can kill a motorcyclist. How To Avoid It: Use cars as your very own crumple zone. A single car stopped at a multi-lane stoplight, with more cars coming from behind? Pull in front of it (wave nicely) and you’re cushioned from any subsequent impacts. Between a line of cars works just as well. No free crumple zones available? Stop to the side rather than the center of a lane, rapidly flash your brake light by tapping a brake lever, keep the bike in gear and your right hand on the throttle. Pay attention to what’s coming up behind you and be prepared to scoot away should it appear someone’s about to come plowing into you. Be particularly aware in situations where there’s bad visibility, at times when drunk driving is prevalent (do all the bars around you let out at 1am?) and when stops are unexpected, such as at pedestrian crosswalks on very busy streets and stuff like those cute baby ducks crossing the road. 6: Your Riding Buddies Are Idiots You’ve seen it happen. A group is out for a ride when one of them stops suddenly or something similar. His buddy is too busy daydreaming to realize and hits him from behind. This has happened to us; it can happen to anyone. How To Avoid It: Make sure everyone is aware of proper group riding etiquette and knows to ride in a staggered formation. You’d be amazed how many people are unaware of this simple technique. Doing so increases vision and moves bikes out of line with each other, meaning a temporary lapse in attention wont’ result in a collision. Pick smarter riding buddies or do what I do: ride alone. 7: You Locked The Front Brake Oh no, a deer/cute girl/cop/stopped traffic. You grab a fistful of front brake and, next thing you know, you’re lying on the ground, watching your bike cartwheel down the street. How To Avoid It: Learn to use your front brake. It might seem counterintuitive, but that front brake is the most powerful and difficult-to-master component on your motorcycle; it can alter your speed much more quickly than your engine. If you’re just learning to ride, have simply never mastered this skill or bought a new bike and need to learn it, find a big, empty parking lot and start practicing. From a set speed (say, 30 mph), start braking at a certain mark, then repeat ad infinitum until you’ve reduced your braking distance as much as possible. You should be able to feel the tire on the very edge of locking up and the rear wheel lifting off the ground. Then go and practice at higher and higher speeds until you can employ the maximum braking ability of your motorcycle reliably and safely. Or just buy a bike with ABS, remember you have it, and squeeze the lever as hard as you can when you need to make an emergency stop. 8: A Car Opened Its Door The biggest gap in traffic was between a line of parked cars and a stationary line of active traffic. So you go scooting through it when, all of a sudden, Nathan-no-look swings his door wide open right in front of you. How To Avoid It: Never, ever, ever, ever ride between an active traffic lane and parked cars. Not just because of the opening doors thing, but because pedestrians step out, cars pull out so they can see, and for a million other reasons. Just don’t do it. If you do, somehow, find yourself in a door-opening situation though, follow all the advice above and brake as hard as possible. Even if a collision is inevitable, shedding even a small fraction of your speed can really help. Riders call the area next to parked cars, within a door's width “The Death Zone” for a reason. 9: It’s Slippery! Stuff is coming out of the sky! That stuff is cold, wet and, surprise surprise, slippery. Listen to experienced wet weather riders and don’t panic. How To Avoid It: Does your bike have decent tires on it or were you silly and decided that running track rubber on the road was a good idea? Hint: it’s not. So long as you’re running reasonable tires and those tires aren’t worn out, you’ll be surprised at how well a motorcycle does in wet or even snowy conditions. Just slow down and be as smooth as possible on the controls. In the wet, stuff like manhole covers become super, extra slippery and you’ll need to watch out for oil and diesel on the road as well. Look for patches of rainbow and avoid those. If it hasn’t rained for a while, the first hour or so of rainfall is the most treacherous; it lifts all the oils and whatnot out of the pavement, floating it on top. Treat yourself to a hot cup of coffee and wait for a solid downpour to wash all that junk away. Also beware of the limited visibility rain creates for other drivers and their general ineptitude; car drivers don’t seem to understand that slippery conditions necessitate longer following distances and earlier braking. I advocate keeping revs up in the wet. The thinking is that, should your rear spin up, you’ll be using a smaller amount of throttle opening, allowing you to regain traction much easier than if you’re riding at 30mph in 6th, at wide open throttle. 10: The Most Common Bike Accident According to the Hurt Report — the largest study ever conducted on motorcycle accident causation — alcohol is a factor in 50 percent of all bike wrecks. How To Avoid It: Don’t drink and ride.
How To Choose The Right Kind Of Motorcycle Added 10/4/2018 A motorcycle is a two-wheeled motor vehicle used for an easy and fast way of transportation. It is relatively more prevalent in developing countries of the world because it is relatively cheap to maintain and operate. With the advancement in technology in recent years, the motorcycle is also specialized in multiple styles. Today’s motorcycle are much more advanced than the past. It is a token of happiness in the family. But this key of happiness is not in finding the best motorcycle available in the market rather than to find right kind of motorcycle for you which depends on upon your requirements and type of riding you want to do. Some motorcycles are specially designed keeping in mind the particular segment of the market while some are general and can be used by anyone. For e.g. some motorcycles are more suited for young generation than the older one and vice versa. For a new rider, a lightweight motorcycle is always better while learning.  Similarly, it is always encouraging to place both the feet on the ground while stopping the motorcycle. Though the experienced rider can stop the motorcycle even by using one foot on the surface.  There are hundreds of models of motorcycles that are available in the market, and the user must narrow down their search to find the right kind of motorcycle. Choosing the Right Kind of Motorcycle    It is always a tough decision to choose the right kind of Motorcycle when so many styles and models are available in the market. In fact, I believe that one type of motorcycle is not enough to meet all the requirements of the rider. Therefore, while choosing the right kind of motorcycle for you, you must first analyse and review the basic purpose for which you will use the motorcycle. There are a lot of options available in the market and the decision primarily depends on upon what you want to do with the bike. It depends whether the rider wants to ride it on the road or off the road. Once the purpose of the motorcycle is decided on then only you can choose the right kind of motorcycle for you based on the below parameters: Analyse the reason of buying a motorcycle Types of roads on which you are mainly going to ride the         motorcycle Budget of buying the motorcycle Five Basic Styles of Motorcycles There are different types of motorcycles available in the market. These can be broadly classified into five categories as follows: 1.  The Naked or Standard Bike This is the basic type of motorcycle which puts the user in an upright position but not able to cope with the blowing wind. Advantages of Standard bike   Standard Bike is available in variety of models with engine         displacement It is easy to ride and controllable It is well-suited for the ride within the city which may or         may not have an even surface. Disadvantages of Standard Bike Standard Bile is not able to cope with blowing wind It makes the rider tired when driving for long periods of         time This type of motorcycle is ideally suited for daily commuter and who can use the motorcycle only occasionally for the long distance ride 2. Cruiser There are many companies that manufacture cruiser type of motorcycles. Advantages of Cruiser In Cruiser, riders are in more relaxed riding position Good Pickup – Most of the models of this type of motorcycle         are 100 cc or more. It is highly comfortable for long rides This type of motorcycle consists of a windshield, luggage         makes it a safe vehicle for long distance rides. It is primarily used for touring purposes. Disadvantages of Cruiser It is having more room for the leg. Therefore to reduce this,         suspension has to be raised 3. Touring This type of motorcycle is designed in such a manner so that it remains comfortable for the rider when riding long distances. This type of vehicle is available with large displacement engines. Advantages of Touring Motorcycle Touring Motorcycle has more fuel and luggage capacity.         Therefore, it can go for ong distances hassle-free It is equipped with windshield provides extra protection to         the rider It is equipped with sound systems used for entertainment         purpose during a long ride Disadvantages of Touring Motorcycle It is more expensive as compared to other types.  The price         of this type of motorcycle is equivalent to the small car. Touring Motorcycle is also heavy in weight which makes it         difficult for new riders. 4. Sport Bike It is another type of motorcycle primarily used for racing purpose. It is the legal version of motorcycle used for competition. Advantages of Sport Bike Riders can lean in the forward direction and ride it         comfortably. High speed vehicle Excellent pickup. As this type of motorcycle is used for         racing purpose, it normally comes in 600cc or more Disadvantages of Sport Bike It is not suited for new riders   5. Dual Purpose / Adventure Touring This is the last category of motorcycle used for dual purpose i.e. touring as well as for riding the normal motorcycle. Advantages of Dual Purpose Bike It is most versatile motorcycle among all the different         categories of motorcycles available in the market Rider can ride the motorcycle in an upright position These are designed for different road conditions. For e.g.         rider can easily ride dual purpose motorcycle in highway         having smooth road as well as in city having uneven         surface, or even off road Disadvantages of Dual Purpose Bike It is not very comfortable while riding for long distance Conclusion The two most important points always need to be kept in mind to a new rider is light weight of the motorcycle and able to touch both feet on the ground while stopping. Luckily, seat height and weight of the motorcycle is always mentioned against each model has key features on the motorcycle manufactures website. Therefore, the rider can always glance at the given motorcycles specs carefully to find the right kind of motorcycle for your intended riding style.  Once you decide the purpose of usage of your motorcycle, the above guidelines will help you to find your dream motorcycle which will be the right fit for you.
** Harley-Davidson recalling 238,380 bikes for clutch problem ** The voluntary safety recall includes all model-year 2017 and 2018 Touring, Trike and CVO  Touring models, as well as some 2017 Softails.  Click here to see if your bike is being recalled.
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