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Spring is in the air, which means that thousands of Missouri motorcycle enthusiasts will be out riding through the Ozarks on some of the most beautiful rural roads that this country has to offer.  While motorcycles are a fun and exhilarating way to tour the area, motorcyclists and their passengers need to be sure to always put safety first, for their own sake, and the sake of all fellow motorists.   Compared to occupants of passenger vehicles, occupants of motorcycles are exposed to risks that are much greater every time they are on the road.  For our friends on motorcycles, we urge you to always: 1. Obey the rules of the road. 2. wear protective riding gear including a helmet. 3. Never operate a motorcycle while impaired. Following these three principals can substantially reduce your risk of injury or death on the road.   And that risk is significant.   Statistically, motorcyclists are twenty-six times more likely to be fatally injured in road traffic accidents compared to occupants of passenger vehicles.  Of all Missouri motorcycle crashes, sixty-six percent resulted in injury and death, and by not wearing a helmet a motorcyclist further increases the likelihood of death.   Also, remember that a passenger can significantly affect the handling characteristics of your motorcycle due to the extra weight and independent motion of your passenger.  Extra caution is required for cornering, more time and space is needed for passing, and the effects of wind will be more pronounced with a passenger. For our friends who are not motorcyclists, but instead choose to drive passenger and commercial vehicles, remember that motorcycles are vehicles with the same rights and privileges as any other vehicle on the roadway. Always allow the motorcyclist a full lane width, and leave yourself extra space between you and motorcyclists.  Because of their relative size, sometimes it is hard to gauge the speed of a motorcycle.  When yielding to an oncoming motorcyclist, don’t just yield the right of way, but also give the benefit of any doubt to the motorcyclist. It is far better to be safe, than to be sorry.  A motorcyclist may initially appear to be a safe distance from you, but they are actually closer than they appear.   You will never regret having taken a little extra time to yield to a motorcyclist, and avoid a crash that changes lives forever. At Larson Law Firm, we encourage all motorists to drive with the highest degree of care, and share the road. At the end of the day, whether you are on a motorcycle, bicycle, passenger vehicle, or otherwise, we all have loved-ones who want to see us arrive alive at our destination.
Larson’s Law Corner
“It’s about taking responsibilty”
Posted: Feb 16, 2017
Posted: June 19, 2017
If you’re a true rider, you live for the summer. While the mention of warm weather has motorcyclists around the country dusting off their saddles, there’s nothing quite like a summer trip in the Ozarks. Hundreds of miles of the most beautiful twisty roads you could imagine. But before you start cleaning out those carbs and heading to the Ozarks, read these safety tips to help keep you on the road.
It’s common knowledge that cold weather will cause your tire pressure to drop. Many people don’t consider the obvious implication of that: warm weather will cause your tire pressure to go up. This is especially a problem for riders coming down from colder states. Over inflated motorcycle tires are more dangerous than under-inflated tires. If you already run high, 3 or 4 PSI can cause significant problems for your riding. Over inflation decreases traction and can cause you to break loose on tight turns. This is a problem because the Ozarks can be extremely hot and humid in the summer, as can the roads. Before you start hitting the twisties, make sure that you adjust your tire pressure once you arrive. A 10 degree temperature change affects tire pressure by 1 PSI on average. Also, remember that the average low and high in the summer can fluctuate as much as thirty degrees.
Leather riding gear will truly test your physical limits when riding the Ozarks. Don’t forget that a leather jacket is useless if it’s packed in your saddlebags. So before you go, it’s best to invest in high-quality mesh gear. Mesh jacket technology has come a long way and a high-quality one will offer similar protection as leather while keeping you cool. Also, the humidity will truly stop sweat from leaving your body, so try to wear breathable athletic clothing. Additionally, it’s hard to notice signs of heat fatigue while you’re riding, be mindful of this when you stop.
Overheating applies to your bike as well. Whether your bike is air or liquid cooled, the hot air and humidity will keep it running hot. Make sure your coolant is fresh, your fan is working, and check your bike at stops. Also, avoid unnecessarily riding at high RPMs. If you’re riding aggressively on twisty roads, stop every so often so your bike can cool down.
Many areas of the Ozarks are rural and uninhabited. While this is part of their natural beauty, it can be dangerous if you end up broken down on the side of the road because you can’t always rely on your cell phone to work. Pack your saddlebags with water, snacks, and a toolkit to fix easy repairs. A tire pump and patch kit are must haves if you plan on going for a long tour.
The Ozarks truly are motorcycle heaven. The endless roads through beautiful mountains are the things that motorcyclists dream about. But before you go, you need to plan ahead and be ready for the harsh environment. An investment in some lightweight gear and safety equipment will allow you to return every summer and enjoy this beautiful slice of the United States!
Posted: June 19, 2017
Did you know- Using helmets can reduce the probability of a fatal injury to the head by about 50% and traumatic face injury by as much as 33%? It is important that your riding armour is in top condition and you need to be sure that it will perform its duty especially when your life depends on it. Helmets can get compromised due to the daily forces of wear and tear. They can also get permanently damaged by impact. It is prudent to look for signs of damage and have it fixed or replaced accordingly. Here’s how you give your helmet a thorough safety inspection: There are five primary components to a motorcycle helmet - an outer shell, a comfort padding, an impact-absorbent liner, a retention system and a visor. These components work together to perform their protective duty i.e. to keep the force of  impact from travelling to your skull. To carry out a thorough inspection, you have to take into account each of this component, and check through for any problems.
This is the hard outer layer that is designed to compress and disperse the energy on impact. Look over this part for any signs of wear and tear, such as cracks, scratches, dents - anything that might compromise the integrity of the shell. Sometimes the shell can get quite brittle due to overexposure to sunlight or heat, which can lessen its ability to disperse force. Some helmets delaminate on impact and some get compressed. It is what they are designed to do. In either case, once a helmet absorbs energy and has taken a hit, the shell is compromised and it is imperative to get it replaced, even if it appears fine on superficial inspection.
This dense layer is as crucial as the shell in the way it absorbs and deflects the force of impact. It is usually made of Expanded Polystyrene Styrofoam, commonly known as EPS. Remove the comfort padding and thoroughly check the EPS for damage such as dents or cracks in the shape of spider-webs. The presence of such damage is an indication of impact and it should not be used any more. Sometimes impact damage to the EPS from a crash is invisible to the naked eye. Which is why, if your helmet has taken a hit, it's prudent to have it replaced even if it appears fine.
This is the soft, cushiony layer that sits right next to your head. It helps the helmet fit comfortably to the shape of the head. It is usually made out of soft foam and cloth material and can be detached so that it can be washed. Check the condition of the comfort liner- Is it frayed? Does it smell funky? Is it compressed with time causing the helmet to fit less snugly? The liner can and should be replaced if needed.
The retention system aka the chin strap is the component that keeps the helmet from flying off your head in a crash. Inspect it for any fraying straps or other forms of wearing. Sometimes you may find cracks or warping in the attachment points. There may be extra heavy fraying around the areas where the strap fits through the D- shaped rings. Don't forget to check the stitches that secure the D-rings to the chin-straps.
This is the transparent, movable component that can cover your face and protect your eyes from insects and dust. Check this component for anything that obstructs vision like gouges, scratches etc. Sometimes the screws that support the hinges can come loose and if this is the case, tighten them up. But be careful, over tightening of aluminium based visor screws can damage the sleeves. Most manufacturers recommend using a helmet for not more than three years, as their components may start deteriorating over time, compromising their protective qualities. Be sure to check the manufacturing date that should be printed somewhere on the EPS liner or the chin-strap.  Some helmet manufacturers offer to repair a damaged helmet when possible. You may take advantage of this service to have it fixed. Wearing a helmet is crucial. Making sure that the helmet is fit for the job is even more so. Quick,regular inspections of helmet can go a long way in keeping you protected while you enjoy your rides. And, as they say, everything looks better from the inside of a helmet.
Copyright © 2017 - Ozark Rides, All Rights Reserved
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Share with Us
Compared to occupants of passenger vehicles, occupants of motorcycles are exposed to risks that are much greater every time they are on the road.  For our friends on motorcycles, we urge you to always: 1. Obey the rules of the road. 2. wear protective riding gear including a helmet. 3. Never operate a motorcycle while impaired. Following these three principals can substantially reduce your risk of injury or death on the road.   And that risk is significant.   Statistically, motorcyclists are twenty-six times more likely to be fatally injured in road traffic accidents compared to occupants of passenger vehicles. Of all Missouri motorcycle crashes, sixty-six percent resulted in injury and death, and by not wearing a helmet a motorcyclist further increases the likelihood of death.   Also, remember that a passenger can significantly affect the handling characteristics of your motorcycle due to the extra weight and independent motion of your passenger. Extra caution is required for cornering, more time and space is needed for passing, and the effects of wind will be more pronounced with a passenger. For our friends who are not motorcyclists, but instead choose to drive passenger and commercial vehicles, remember that motorcycles are vehicles with the same rights and privileges as any other vehicle on the roadway. Always allow the motorcyclist a full lane width, and leave yourself extra space between you and motorcyclists.  Because of their relative size, sometimes it is hard to gauge the speed of a motorcycle.  When yielding to an oncoming motorcyclist, don’t just yield the right of way, but also give the benefit of any doubt to the motorcyclist. It is far better to be safe, than to be sorry. A motorcyclist may initially appear to be a safe distance from you, but they are actually closer than they appear.   You will never regret having taken a little extra time to yield to a motorcyclist, and avoid a crash that changes lives forever. At Larson Law Firm, we encourage all motorists to drive with the highest degree of care, and share the road. At the end of the day, whether you are on a motorcycle, bicycle, passenger vehicle, or otherwise, we all have loved-ones who want to see us arrive alive at our destination.
Larson’s Law Corner
“It’s about taking responsibilty”
Spring is in the air, which means that thousands of Missouri motorcycle enthusiasts will be out riding through the Ozarks on some of the most beautiful rural roads that this country has to offer.  While motorcycles are a fun and exhilarating way to tour the area, motorcyclists and their passengers need to be sure to always put safety first, for their own sake, and the sake of all fellow motorists.
Posted: Feb 16, 2017
Posted: June 19, 2017
If you’re a true rider, you live for the summer. While the mention of warm weather has motorcyclists around the country dusting off their saddles, there’s nothing quite like a summer trip in the Ozarks. Hundreds of miles of the most beautiful twisty roads you could imagine. But before you start cleaning out those carbs and heading to the Ozarks, read these safety tips to help keep you on the road.
It’s common knowledge that cold weather will cause your tire pressure to drop. Many people don’t consider the obvious implication of that: warm weather will cause your tire pressure to go up. This is especially a problem for riders coming down from colder states. Over inflated motorcycle tires are more dangerous than under-inflated tires. If you already run high, 3 or 4 PSI can cause significant problems for your riding. Over inflation decreases traction and can cause you to break loose on tight turns. This is a problem because the Ozarks can be extremely hot and humid in the summer, as can the roads. Before you start hitting the twisties, make sure that you adjust your tire pressure once you arrive. A 10 degree temperature change affects tire pressure by 1 PSI on average. Also, remember that the average low and high in the summer can fluctuate as much as thirty degrees.
Leather riding gear will truly test your physical limits when riding the Ozarks. Don’t forget that a leather jacket is useless if it’s packed in your saddlebags. So before you go, it’s best to invest in high-quality mesh gear. Mesh jacket technology has come a long way and a high-quality one will offer similar protection as leather while keeping you cool. Also, the humidity will truly stop sweat from leaving your body, so try to wear breathable athletic clothing. Additionally, it’s hard to notice signs of heat fatigue while you’re riding, be mindful of this when you stop.
Overheating applies to your bike as well. Whether your bike is air or liquid cooled, the hot air and humidity will keep it running hot. Make sure your coolant is fresh, your fan is working, and check your bike at stops. Also, avoid unnecessarily riding at high RPMs. If you’re riding aggressively on twisty roads, stop every so often so your bike can cool down.
Many areas of the Ozarks are rural and uninhabited. While this is part of their natural beauty, it can be dangerous if you end up broken down on the side of the road because you can’t always rely on your cell phone to work. Pack your saddlebags with water, snacks, and a toolkit to fix easy repairs. A tire pump and patch kit are must haves if you plan on going for a long tour.
The Ozarks truly are motorcycle heaven. The endless roads through beautiful mountains are the things that motorcyclists dream about. But before you go, you need to plan ahead and be ready for the harsh environment. An investment in some lightweight gear and safety equipment will allow you to return every summer and enjoy this beautiful slice of the United States!
Posted: June 19, 2017
Did you know- Using helmets can reduce the probability of a fatal injury to the head by about 50% and traumatic face injury by as much as 33%? It is important that your riding armour is in top condition and you need to be sure that it will perform its duty especially when your life depends on it. Helmets can get compromised due to the daily forces of wear and tear. They can also get permanently damaged by impact. It is prudent to look for signs of damage and have it fixed or replaced accordingly. Here’s how you give your helmet a thorough safety inspection: There are five primary components to a motorcycle helmet - an outer shell, a comfort padding, an impact- absorbent liner, a retention system and a visor. These components work together to perform their protective duty i.e. to keep the force of  impact from travelling to your skull. To carry out a thorough inspection, you have to take into account each of this component, and check through for any problems.
This is the hard outer layer that is designed to compress and disperse the energy on impact. Look over this part for any signs of wear and tear, such as cracks, scratches, dents - anything that might compromise the integrity of the shell. Sometimes the shell can get quite brittle due to overexposure to sunlight or heat, which can lessen its ability to disperse force. Some helmets delaminate on impact and some get compressed. It is what they are designed to do. In either case, once a helmet absorbs energy and has taken a hit, the shell is compromised and it is imperative to get it replaced, even if it appears fine on superficial inspection.
This dense layer is as crucial as the shell in the way it absorbs and deflects the force of impact. It is usually made of Expanded Polystyrene Styrofoam, commonly known as EPS. Remove the comfort padding and thoroughly check the EPS for damage such as dents or cracks in the shape of spider-webs. The presence of such damage is an indication of impact and it should not be used any more. Sometimes impact damage to the EPS from a crash is invisible to the naked eye. Which is why, if your helmet has taken a hit, it's prudent to have it replaced even if it appears fine.
This is the soft, cushiony layer that sits right next to your head. It helps the helmet fit comfortably to the shape of the head. It is usually made out of soft foam and cloth material and can be detached so that it can be washed. Check the condition of the comfort liner- Is it frayed? Does it smell funky? Is it compressed with time causing the helmet to fit less snugly? The liner can and should be replaced if needed.
The retention system aka the chin strap is the component that keeps the helmet from flying off your head in a crash. Inspect it for any fraying straps or other forms of wearing. Sometimes you may find cracks or warping in the attachment points. There may be extra heavy fraying around the areas where the strap fits through the D-shaped rings. Don't forget to check the stitches that secure the D-rings to the chin-straps.
This is the transparent, movable component that can cover your face and protect your eyes from insects and dust. Check this component for anything that obstructs vision like gouges, scratches etc. Sometimes the screws that support the hinges can come loose and if this is the case, tighten them up. But be careful, over tightening of aluminium based visor screws can damage the sleeves. Most manufacturers recommend using a helmet for not more than three years, as their components may start deteriorating over time, compromising their protective qualities. Be sure to check the manufacturing date that should be printed somewhere on the EPS liner or the chin-strap.  Some helmet manufacturers offer to repair a damaged helmet when possible. You may take advantage of this service to have it fixed. Wearing a helmet is crucial. Making sure that the helmet is fit for the job is even more so. Quick,regular inspections of helmet can go a long way in keeping you protected while you enjoy your rides. And, as they say, everything looks better from the inside of a helmet.
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